Bike ride through Liverpool’s uncommon places

Bike route through Liverpool

Alternative journeys

Digital Wishing Wells on Mere Lane!

As part of our North Liverpool collaborations with our Healthy Spaces colleagues at FACT a second new neighbourhood Health Centre opened last month on Mere Lane in Breckfield complete with it’s own digital wishing well!


Over a period of a couple of months tenantspin worked with Breckfield and North Everton Neighbourhood Council and residents from across the neighbourhood to collect anonymous wishes and handprints to put into the artwork in the centre.

The piece is the work of Alistair Eilbeck and James Bailey who are also exhibiting at the moment in The Humble Market at FACT. The work features a digital display of handprints donated by local people during the workshops run by tenantspin, artist Jonathan Browning and positive communities worker Charanjeet Birdie which too place at the wonderful Rotunda College, Vauxhall Neighbourhood Council, BNENC, Maritime Court and Thirlemere Court all the vicinity of the health Centre. Wishes include perfect jobs, wellness for family and friends, lotto wins and wishes for superhero status!

Visitors to the centre can donate their handprints and wishes to the artwork via an onsite process in this most special of health centres! To hear the wishes left by participants listen here and to see some of the hands donated see here.

Townsend Lane Health Centre is open!

tenantspin have been working in partnership with FACT’s Healthy Spaces programme, ABCC, B2U residents association, Anfield Childrens centre and residents across the neighbourhood on a new artwork.

The artwork is inside Townsend Lane Health Centre, a new neighbourhood health centre built on the site of the former All Saints School and more historically a mansion called Mulberry House.

It is the work of artists Alastair Eilbeck and James Bailey and is full of 75 portraits of local people waiting at bus-stops – a reflection on waiting in a Health Centre.

Over 6 weeks, tenantspin worked with B2U residents association, Anfield, Breckside Community Council, Richmond Fellowship and even artist Jeremy Bailey to collect images of the local area in photo tours run by artist Washington Buckley and collecting archive images and memories for the artwork which responds to movement in the centre and contains a directional speaker in which you can hear the memories – some of which were donated by tenantspin’s Laura’s uncle!

To hear the memories visit here and to see the pictures gathered by the photo groups visit here

Visiting Dublin and Creating a New Old

tenantspin visited Dublin for the creating a new old conference which took place at the Royal Hospital Kilmainham an amazing ex-army hospital. The conference was supported in part by The Baring Foundation an amazing foundation which fights to improve the conditions of those living with disadvantage through their fund. tenantspin has recently been in receipt of a fund from the Baring Foundation to work across 10 sheltered schemes with our partner Your Housing on projects which seek to enhance the kind of access older people have to technology. The project, Electric Blanket, will work with residents and their scheme managers to create a technology-driven collective artwork, giving participants access to the best digital artists practicing in creative technology based in real situations and which actively allows older people to use the internet and technology to express themselves and also have a practical experience of the valuable resources that wait beyond the www.

Watch this space for updates on the project which will take place over the next year.

The end of an era: John ‘Spoons’ McGuirk.

John McGuirk had been a member of tenantspin since 2003. Brought to FACT by his dear friend Dolly Lloyd. He was auditioning to be in a CD tenantspin were putting together and he was really involved with the cities music scene. Alan Dunn, project manager for tenantspin at the time simply remembers him sitting down and playing his spoons to which all where amazed. Spoon playing was a theme with John and this continued over his arts career earning him a place in the hearts of many projects visited across Europe and America and a place with the Philharmonic Orchestra as part of the Liverpool Biennial.

His contribution to the cities arts scene in his nearly 10 year was legendary –and he was 70 when he joined the team at tenantspin.

He was a brilliant presenter, a great speaker, political, sociable and with unbending beliefs. He believed avidly in ghosts and the paranormal and worked on innumerable projects including travelling to Dublin, Copenhagen, New York, Rotterdam and Dresden to represent the project.

His contribution to the tenantspin project was immense and on behalf of all of us who worked with him in FACT, tenantspin and beyond across the arts projects in the city thank you John you are and where one in a million, may you rest in peace.

You can see some of John’s digital stories here:

http://www.youtube.com/user/NorthLiverpoolDS?ob=0

Memories workshops, Townsend Lane Health Centre

tenantspin have been working with our one of our fantastic community partners in Anfield ABCC our colleagues in the Healthy Spaces Programme at FACT, Richmond Fellowship and residents from across Anfield to create a special artwork to be installed in the new Townsend Lane health centre in 2012.

The artwork was developed by the Townsend Lane steering group and is the work of artist Alistair Eilbeck and will feature lots of portraits of local people waiting at bus stops along the many bus routes in the vicinity of the new health centre which is a real artery of the community. The piece will also contain memories from local people remembering the Townsend Lane of their lives, memories of traveling around on the many buses that move around the area and photographs of Townsend Lane past and present taken by groups and individuals from the local neighbourhood.

We held our first sharing workshop sessions at ABCC this week and had a great couple of hours remembering Townsend Lane which became a thoroughfare as far back as 1850 when most of the surrounding area was farm land. In fact, as we discovered that the word Breck literally translates as ‘area of uncultivated land’ pointing to the look of Breck Road before it became the familiar thoroughfare it is today.

Look out for the artwork in the new year, Townsend Lane Neighbourhood Health Centre waiting room.

I had my wedding reception in the Farmers Arms on Townsend Lane, my wedding cake was a copy of St Georges church on Everton Road.